Sunday, July 16, 2006

Odds and ends in La belle province


These are a few of my favourite things - dans la belle province

Le Bismark - eat it and weep.
Consists of a foot long hot dog wiener nestled in a custom-made white spongey sliced-bread-type bun, topped with a golden cascade of thick, slightly undercooked french fries. Your choice of toppings (I recommend lots of onions, with a side order of poutine for your dairy content, and a large Coke, no ice.) Window shattering belches guaranteed. Available at finer street-meat stands in the lovely town of Shawinigan, QC. Hand model and Bismark/poutine combo ingestor (she did it!): Joanne Hui



"Attention à nos enfants. C'est peut-être...le vôtre"

This comforting sign can be found all over small town Quebec. The caption loosely translates to: "Watch out for our children. This one could be yours." It features a once care-free androgynous child, fresh from an encounter with a speeding car. Bloody gruesome!

Notice how the child's left shoe is missing, and the sock has been slightly yanked from his/her foot. That explains all those single shoes I keep finding on the street. I've always wondered, how can someone just lose one shoe and not notice?



Restothèque - Somewhere off highway 138

Boogie on down to the salad bar! I made my friend Tod slow the car down and hold up traffic so I could get this slightly blurry shot of this great sign. Unfortunately, we'd already eaten, otherwise I would have enjoyed a bit of BeeGees avec mon 'amburger all dress, pas d'oignons. That stretch of highway between Québec City and Montréal (the longer scenic route, not the 2 lane speedway highway 40) is one of my farourite drives in the province. You see loads of the real-deal 'villages d'antan', small towns that still have many 100-year old houses right on the main drag.



Restrooms at Bar laitier Le Grizzly! Granby, Québec

I love the clash of artisanal woodworking, outhouse aesthetics, anthropomorphism, and 1950's B-movie poster inspired font.
Summer 2004

2 comments:

Scholzy said...

Thanks for this. cultural flotsam becomes more important if we take notice, and we are taking notice.
Doug

Scholzy said...

Thanks for this. cultural flotsam becomes less so when we take notice, and we notice what is going on around us.
Doug